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James Marshall Hendrix was born November 27, 1942 and died this day September 18, 1970.  You won’t find to many people that will argue that he was the greatest guitar player of all time. Thanks to a610 for the All Along The Watchtower video.  It’s just one of my many favorites.  Another one is pretty rare, it’s before the experience when he was with Lonnie Youngblood, its called She’s a Fox.  It’s a bit different, you can listen to it by scrolling down on the left in the black BOX.  You can also hear Bold as Love in that BOX. Tighten up your headband! enjoy

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Yes it is defiantly the yodel in this song that grabs you, even if it shocks or even amuses you at first, it will entrance you to listen.  What a great song.  If you want to hear the whole thing, scroll down a little and it is on the black BOX on the left.  Happy Birthday Hank Williams Sr.  September 17, 1923  to January 1, 1953.  Thanks to Gatorrocks786 for a very good video.

BB King was born Riley B. King on this day September 16, 1925 in Itta Bena, Mississippi.  The reality that you can still see a legend live in person, like BB King is just mind blowing, and he play’s a lot of shows.  So get out there and see this man, he is awesome in concert!  Rolling Stone Magazine in its 2003 listing has BB King as the third Greatest Guitar player of all time.  First and second is Jimi Hendrix and Duane Allman.  From my calculations he is 43 years old in this video but he sure looks a lot younger then that.  Thanks to brucutu30 for the cool Jazz Blues.  Here is BB King, King of the Blues with Sonny Freeman- Drums, James Toney- Organ, Mose Thomas- Trumpet and Lee Gatling on Sax in 1968 on Ralph Gleason’s Jazz Casual. enjoy!

Here’s some flower power, Bob Dylan Like a Rolling Stone was a Chart Topper this day in 1965. Thanks to mikemessedup for the video.

You’ve probably heard the rumors months ago and already heard that they were confirmed day’s ago.  The three remaining members Page, Plant and Jones are getting back together with the son of John Bonham on drums, Jason Bonham.  I’m not expecting all that much from the music but you have to admit, it will be history in the making.  Besides it gives me an excuse to ROCK.  So here is Led Zeppelin with a (3 part) solo by John Bonham playing Moby Dick!  NOW THIS IS ROCK AND ROLL  Thanks to shumpy for the three videos.  Awesome

 Thanks to Dreamer2TV for the LeAnn Rimes video.

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President James Madison and his wife Dolly barely escaped to safety as the British set the President’s Manson, the Capitol and other public buildings ablaze as they captured Washington in 1814, even though they were out numbered two to one by the Americans.  The British had also captured a Dr. William Beanes who happened to be a friend of Mr. Frances Scott Key a Georgetown lawyer, husband and father of six boys and five girls.  Mr. Key and John S. Skinner, a US Government agent went to the British forces in Chesapeake to deal for the release of Dr. Beanes, they explained to the British Officers that the doctor had saved wounded British solders lives.  The British agreed to the release of Dr. Beanes but detained the three men on a ship until after their planned attack on Baltimore, America’s third largest city at that time.  Having planned a joint attack by land and water, the British General Ross and his troops landed in Maryland and soon ran into the American front forces, where British General Ross would meet his demise by the bullet of a sharp shooter.  The British forces having under estimated the strength of the Americans, pulled back to wait for the cover of darkness for their next attack on the evening of September 13, 1814.  Meanwhile the British navy had made its way to a position to attack Fort McHenry, that same morning September 13, at 6:30 am the British Admiral Cochrane’s ships, with Mr. Key aboard, began its attack.  For twenty-four hours the British rained down ten and thirteen inch bombshells and rockets that burst into flames and fell on Fort McHenry and her defenders, who were too far out of range to return fire.  When the British ships moved closer, the Americans gained their range and damaged the British ships so badly it forced them to pull back.  The Americans held the powerful British Navy off all night and at 7:30 on the morning of September 14, the British Admiral Cochrane called off the attack, and this was one of the main turning points in the War of 1812.

In June of 1813 Mary Pickersgill was commissioned by Major George Armistead to sew two flags for Fort McHenry.  The first flag measured 17 feet by 25 feet and since it was a stormy day on September 13, 1814 this was the flag that was flying over Fort McHenry during the raging battle between the British Fleet and Fort McHenry.  At dawn, the morning of September 14, 1814 as the British began to retreat, Major Armistead ordered his men to raise the larger flag that Mary Pickersgill and her daughter, two nieces, and an indentured African American girl had sewn.  This flag is “The Star Spangled Banner,” that inspired Mr. Frances Scott Key to write his poem that would later become our national anthem.  This Flag measured a huge thirty feet by forty-two feet wide, the modern garrison flags used today by the United States Army only measure 20 by 38 feet.  The flag is about the equivalent of a quarter the size of a basketball court.  The fifteen stars are each a massive two foot wide from point to point and each or the fifteen strips measure two feet wide.  The flag was made out of English wool and the stars are cotton.

Every time I hear this song it chokes me up because I love this country so much.  It is truly the best Country in the world.  I dedicate this post not only to the American forces fighting for our Freedom but for all men and women who acknowledge the danger and fight this fight.  May The Almighty God Bless you all and keep you safe.  The song we sing as our national anthem is usually sung with only the first part or verse.  Here is the whole poem by Frances Scott Key.

O say, can you see, by the dawn’s early light,
What so proudly we hailed at the twilight’s last gleaming,
Whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight
O’er the ramparts we watched, were so gallantly streaming?
And the rockets’ red glare, the bombs bursting in air
Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there;
O say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

On the shore, dimly seen thro’ the mist of the deep,
Where the foe’s haughty host in dread silence reposes,
What is that which the breeze, o’er the towering steep,
As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?
Now it catches the gleam of the morning’s first beam,
In full glory reflected, now shines on the stream
’Tis the star-spangled banner. Oh! long may it wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion
A home and a country should leave us no more?
Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps’ pollution.
No refuge could save the hireling and slave
From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave,
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

Oh! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand
Between their loved homes and the war’s desolation,
Blest with vict’ry and peace, may the Heav’n-rescued land
Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation!
Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
And this be our motto: “In God is our Trust”
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

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