You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Germany’ category.

porsche-356-speedster.jpg

porsche-and-son.jpgI said in a post a few weeks back that the Porsche 356 (bathtub) was always one of my favorite cars, so here is just a bit on the history of that car.  After World War II in 1948 the Porsche Firm moved to Austria and produced farm and industrial motors.   Ferry Porsche, son of Dr. Ing Ferdinand Porsche, designed and fabricated the first #356 car, model 356-001.  It was later raced at the Innsbruck city race, winning in the 1100cc class in its first outing.  In 1950 the factory was relocated to Zuffenhausen, Germany and history was made on this day September 1, 1950 when the first Porsche with a Porsche made engine was produced.  After an awesome win at Le Mans with the Porsche 356-002 in 1951, Porsche had proudly put its name in the history books.  The factory would produce nearly 80,000 Porsche 356 type’s till 1965.  The price for a 1952 coupe, $4,200, for a 1954 Super $4,400 and for a 1955 Speedster only $3,500.  Yes, I realize that was a lot of money back then but I sure wish I had then what I have now.  My own personal note is that I did own a 1972 914 (poor man’s Porsche) in my younger days.  Related to Porsche, when I lived in California I owned a VW Baja Bug for the dunes, I think it was a 1974 and also for the street, my favorite car I ever owned was a 1960 VW Beatle, man that was the best car in the world.  Although, you know if you’ve ever owned a VW, it is a love- hate relationship.  I do sometimes miss fixing something on that car every single day, especially the windshield wipers.  Ahh memories!  If you are looking for something a little newer, below from foreground to background: Porsche 718 RSK Spyder, a Porsche 718 RSK F1, Porsche 904, and Porsche 356B Abarth Carrera GTL

porsche_718_rsk_spyder.jpg

claudia-schiffer.jpg

Claudia Schiffer, supermodel born this day August 25, 1970 in Rheinberg, Germany.  After being discovered in a disco she appeared on the cover of ELLE magazine and it didn’t take long before she was considered a supermodel after appearing on many other magazines. She received work from companies such as Guess jeans, Revlon, Dolce & Gabbana, Ralph Lauren, Vanity Fair, Harper’s Bazaar, Cosmopolitan and many others, she has been on the cover of over 500 magazines.  She has also made some television appearances as well as made a few movies.  This is a Flacoscan I downloaded off this website.

Last week I read a couple of  articles and Here, on the net about the Russian Government selling some 250 Sukhoi-30 Long Range Fighter Jets to the Iranian Government.  The SU- 30 is not even close to the best Jet Russia has to offer, we should be glad Russia did not sell them any of the SU-47’s, well it wasn’t reported in the news anyway, but who really knows what Russia is selling the Iranians?   The SU -47 is one wicked looking jet fighter.  It’s just comforting to know that The United States has had a forward swept wing jet since 1984, the U.S. X – 29 below and who knows what else our government has in the works to protect our great country.  Unfortunately, the reality is that even our own forward swept wing U.S. X -29 was based on a Jet from World War II, the Junkers Ju 287 which was a German Luftwaffe aircraft begun in early 1943 and had it’s test flight on August 16, 1944.  It was a sort of Frankenstein’s monster, pieced together from several diffent aircraft. Including the nose wheels from two B-24 Liberators, a fuselage of an He 177 and the tail was constructed of Ju 388 parts.  Even then, the Soviets were closer to that project than the Americans.  The Germans had made 17 test flights with the Ju 287 V1 before the allies overran the testing airfield and captured the V1 and the nearly complete V2, and who do you think flew the V2?  Correct, the Soviet Union made a test flight in 1947, and the V3 with improvements failed to get off the drawing board.  My point isn’t that because these jets have forward swept wings it somehow makes them any more lethal, but you have to admit it does make them look futuristic, even if the design does go all the way back to 1943.  Thanks to Realpolitik1776 for the video.

swept-wings.jpg

.

berlinwalldancing.jpg

On June 12, 1987 President Ronald Reagan gave a speech that helped to put into motion an event I will never forget.  You may have heard of it even if you are not that aware of world events.  The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.  The speech President Ronald Reagan gave, was to the people of West Berlin but the people on the East side of the wall were listening as well.  The whole speech was 2,703 words but the four words that will live in History forever are “tear down this wall.”  The building of the wall The President was speaking of was started in the early morning hours on this day August 13, 1961 to stop the citizens of East Germany  from seeking a better life in West Germany.  After World War II, Nazi Germany as well as the old capital of Berlin was divided into four parts among the occupying Allied powers, Americans, British, French and Soviets.  The Cold War brought Read the rest of this entry »

jesseowens.jpgSpeaking of sick cult leaders, no conversation or article would be complete on this subject without mentioning Adolph Hitler, who ironically was hosting the Olympics in Berlin on this day August 9, 1936 when  Jesse Owens won his fourth gold medal. 

Jesse Owens, the son of a black sharecropper from Alabama stole the show when he won his fourth gold medal in the 4×100 meter relay, after winning gold medals in his three individual events.  The fact that three other black Americans also won did little to please Hitler, but the applause from the German crowds for Owens was thunderous.  In 1935 at the Big Track and Field Championships, Owens equaled or set world records in four events, the 100 and 220-yard dashes, 200-yard low hurdles and the long jump. He was also credited with world marks in the 200-meter hurdles and 200-meter run.  Six world records in one afternoon, and he did it all in 45 minutes!  In 1976, Jesse was awarded the highest honor a civilian of the United States can receive. President Gerald R. Ford awarded him with the Medal of Freedom.   Several years later at the age of 66, Jesse Owens died on March 31, 1980.  Jesse Owens Official website.